New England’s apple crop approaching its peak

Russell Powell New England apple varieties, Seasonal Leave a Comment

Honeycrisp apples with Mount Ascutney in the distance at Wellwood Orchard, Springfield, Vermont. (Bar Lois Weeks photo)

Honeycrisp apples with Mount Ascutney in the distance at Wellwood Orchards, Springfield, Vermont. (Bar Lois Weeks photo)

Honeycrisp apples will soon be ready for picking at Green Mountain Orchards, Putney, Vermont. (Bar Lois Weeks photo)

Honeycrisp apples will soon be ready for picking at Green Mountain Orchards, Putney, Vermont.             (Bar Lois Weeks photo)

A BRIEF TOUR of Vermont orchards Monday shows how New England’s 2016 apple crop is shaping up. Mid-season varieties like Cortland, Honeycrisp, and McIntosh are gaining color and size, and are already being picked in some locations, just days away in others.

Without more rain in September, the apples may be smaller than usual on average, and this year’s crop is considerably smaller than 2015’s bumper harvest. The season may not last as long as normal at some orchards as a result.

But as these pictures show, there are plenty of beautiful apples out there, and a visit to the orchard provides spectacular views, near and far. It should be a great fall.

It is always a good idea to call ahead to see what apples are ripe for picking. To find an orchard near you, visit the Orchard Finder on the New England Apples website. Click on your state to find complete listings and contact information.

The late-season heirloom Northern Spy at Wellwood Orchard will gain red color and size between now and October. (Russell Steven Powell photo)

The late-season heirloom Northern Spy at Wellwood Orchards will gain red color and size between now and October. (Russell Steven Powell photo)

Wellwood Orchard owner Roy Mark stands by his Honeycrisp. (Bar Lois Weeks photo)

Wellwood Orchard owner Roy Mark stands by his Honeycrisp. (Bar Lois Weeks photo)

Jonagold compares favorably with Honeycrisp in flavor and crispness. They ripen in late September at Wellwood Orchard. (Russell Steven Powell photo)

Jonagold compares favorably with Honeycrisp in flavor and crispness. They ripen in late September at Wellwood Orchards. (Russell Steven Powell photo)

McIntosh remains New England's most popular apple for its distinctive flavor and aroma. These Macs at Green Mountain Orchards will be ready soon. (Bar Lois Weeks photo)

McIntosh remains New England’s most popular apple for its distinctive flavor and aroma. These Macs at Green Mountain Orchards will be ripe soon. (Bar Lois Weeks photo)

RubyMac is a newer strain of McIntosh with strong flavor and the color that gives it its name. (Russell Steven Powell photo)

Hackett’s Orchard, South Hero, Vermont, grows RubyMac, a newer strain of McIntosh with strong flavor and the deep red color that gives it its name. (Russell Steven Powell photo)

A row of young RubyMac trees loaded with apples at Hackett's Orchard, South Hero, Vermont. (Russell Steven Powell photo)

A row of young RubyMac trees are loaded with apples at Hackett’s Orchard. (Russell Steven Powell photo)

Manager Jim Bove of Chapin Orchard, Essex Junction, Vermont, shares his love of apples with customers. (Bar Lois Weeks photo)

Manager Jim Bove of Chapin Orchard, Essex Junction, Vermont       (Bar Lois Weeks photo)

An apple tree does not have to grow straight to bear plenty of apples at Chapin Orchard. (Bar Lois Weeks photo)

This apple tree at Chapin Orchard does not have to grow straight to bear plenty of apples. (Bar Lois Weeks photo)

The beautiful striping on Cortland apples will deepen in color between now and harvest at Chapin Orchard. (Russell Steven Powell photo)

The beautiful striping on Cortland apples at Chapin Orchard will deepen in color between now and harvest. (Russell Steven Powell photo)

 

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