Frequently Asked Questions

The best ways to determine an apple’s ripeness are simply by tasting it, by observing the color of its skin, or by checking its seeds (they are dark brown or black when the fruit is ripe).
Wrap your hand around each apple, placing your fingers on either side of the stem. Roll the apple upward and give a slight twist to keep from removing the fruit spur inside the cluster of leaves at the base of the apple, which contains the following year’s bud.
Almost any apple can be used in a pie, and many chefs like to combine several varieties for flavor, texture, and aroma. But some apples excel in pie by themselves. Among the outstanding early season pie apples are Gravenstein, followed by mid-season varieties like Cortland or McIntosh. Late season pie apples include Mutsu, Rome, and the heirlooms Baldwin and Northern Spy.
Keep your apples cold to maintain crispness. If left at room temperature, most varieties will begin to soften in a few days. For best results, store apples in a bag in the crisper drawer of your refrigerator.
The New England Apple Association supports science-based biotechnology that protects consumer health, the environment, and the marketplace. At this time, there is no demand for GMO apples, and no consensus about GMO produce, and no New England growers are planting GMO apples, to our knowledge.

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